Babies | Fort Worth Zoo
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Did Someone Say Baby Boom?

Meet the Zoo's newest additions! Not only are these babies adorable, but each birth also marks a huge conservation success. Below, you'll get a quick introduction — then you can plan your visit (or visits) to the Zoo and watch these big babies grow! 

Did you know Zoo members receive one year of unlimited admission to the Zoo every day (during regular operating hours) plus FREE parking?

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Baby gorilla and mom

The newest primate is only the second gorilla born in Zoo history. Bruno, a male western lowland gorilla, was born early Sunday morning, Nov. 6, 2022, to parents Gracie and Elmo. His older brother, Gus, was the first gorilla born at the Zoo in 2015.

Bruno is staying close to his mother as he meets other troop members and gets acclimated to his surroundings in the Zoo’s World of Primates habitat. The pair continues to bond but is also fully integrated into the troop, mimicking family dynamics in the wild. He can be seen in both indoor or outdoor areas of the habitat at various times during the day, which will be dictated by weather conditions and his activity level. 

The Zoo is incredibly proud to share this conservation success with the community. Western lowland gorillas are listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) due to hunting and disease. Gorillas also have an alarmingly low reproductive rate (at an observed rate of 3 percent population increase), so even if there was a drastic decline in hunting and disease, it could take at least 75 years for population recovery to occur in optimistic scenarios. The Zoo participates in a cooperative breeding program for gorillas that maintains a healthy, self-sustaining population of the vulnerable species to help prevent their extinction.  

Visit Bruno at the Zoo


baby giraffe with dad

At birth, Sherlock weighed 171 pounds and measured 5 feet, 10 inches tall. Just a few weeks later, his sidekick Watson was born, standing 6 feet, 3 inches tall. Following behind the Zoo’s other boy babies, western lowland gorilla Bruno (November 2022) and Asian elephant Brazos (October 2021), these two male giraffes are doubling our baby boy joy!

You can see Sherlock and Watson exploring the African Savanna habitat and getting to know their herd members, including baby girl Pele, born this June.

The Fort Worth Zoo houses reticulated giraffes, a name that describes the mammal’s chestnut-brown rectangular markings. Like human fingerprints, each giraffe pattern is different. Native to the African savannas, a giraffe’s most distinguishing feature is its long neck, which can account for 7 feet of its height.

Visit Sherlock and Watson at the Zoo
Baby Asian elephant and mom

Brazos turned 1 year old in October 2022 and now stands 5 feet tall and weighs 1,475 pounds. As part of his healthy development, he’s gaining 15 to 30 pounds each week! All Asian elephants grow tusks, but only the male elephants’ are visible from the exterior. (Females have short tusks in their mouths called tushes.) Brazos’ second tusk recently emerged on Dec. 17 but won’t be visible until it’s at least 2 to 3 inches long. He continues the training sessions he began when he was just 3 months old and knows 13 different behaviors to date. Each of these behaviors assist keepers and veterinary staff in his daily care.

Brazos' birth was a major triumph for the endangered Asian elephant species. He is the fourth elephant birth in the Fort Worth Zoo’s 112-year history. Brazos was born to parents Bluebonnet and Romeo. Visit Brazos and the rest of the herd in the Elephant Springs habitat.

Today, only an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 Asian elephants remain in the wild, with about 14,000 kept in managed collections around the world. In April, the Zoo opened its newest habitat, Elephant Springs, which includes multiple lush, green spaces and various watering holes for Asian elephants and greater one-horned rhino to roam. This award-winning, $32 million, state-of-the-art habitat further solidifies the Zoo’s commitment to elephant conservation and management here at home and around the world. Listed as endangered since 1976, populations continue to decline for this species and if the trend continues, zoos are going to be the only place that’s left for these animals. The Asian elephant is one of 68 endangered species at the Fort Worth Zoo.

 Visit Brazos at the Zoo


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