Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

When was the Fort Worth Zoo formed?
The Fort Worth Zoo was founded in 1909 with one lion, two bear cubs, an alligator, a coyote, a peacock and a few rabbits. Click here to learn more about the Zoo’s history.

How much does it cost to run the Fort Worth Zoo for a year?
Every year, the Fort Worth Zoo invests a significant portion of its annual operating budget into animal care, conservation and education programs. The Zoo’s annual operating budget is approximately $20 million.

Who owns the Fort Worth Zoo?
The Fort Worth Zoo is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization run by the Fort Worth Zoological Association. In 1991, the Fort Worth Zoological Association assumed management of the Zoo from the City of Fort Worth, forming a successful public-private partnership.

How many animals does the Fort Worth Zoo house?
The Fort Worth Zoo’s animal collection includes more than 7,000 specimens, representing more than 500 species.

How many animal keepers work at the Fort Worth Zoo?
The Fort Worth Zoo employs more than 75 animal keepers. Animal keeper positions can be found in a variety of departments such as animal collections, nutritional services, animal health and animal outreach.

How big is the Fort Worth Zoo?
The Fort Worth Zoo is 64 acres in size and has been at its current location since 1910.

Can I interview or shadow an animal keeper or veterinarian?
The Fort Worth Zoo does not provide one-on-one keeper shadowing opportunities. Please see the Zoo’s Homework Help page for more information.

What information do you have on the animal I am researching?
If the specific animal can be found at the Fort Worth Zoo, you can start your research on our website. We have also listed several useful websites below.


Where do I look for more information?

Are you or your students doing a report about an animal? Here are some helpful hints to find what you need. The best place to start is online. The Fort Worth Zoo’s website offers a wealth of information, just a click away! You can also use Google or other search engines to see what information is available. Keep in mind the most accurate information will be found on websites of zoos, natural history museums, well-known conservation organizations and government agencies. There are also many books, periodicals and reference materials available that can help with your research.

Groups & Organizations

Conservation Organizations

Publications/Television

Government Agencies