World of Primates welcomes female mandrill

World of Primates welcomes female mandrill

The World of Primates’ newest member is a female mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx). Most known for its vivid coloring, the mandrill has a red and blue muzzle and a bluish-purple rump (the coloring is more pronounced in males than in females and juveniles). Many animals do not have color vision, but primates are an exception. This particular primate uses its color vision for a special purpose: The mandrill’s bright coloration makes it easier for the monkey to locate other members of its species. It can spot a fellow mandrill from either end – from the front by recognizing its red and blue face or from behind by recognizing its blue rump. The mandrill is the largest of all the monkey species, and its body is built for the ground and the trees above. Its rotating joints allow it to climb trees in search of a resting spot and walk on the ground when scavenging for food. The mandrill has extremely long canine teeth to help it rip apart food – its varied diet includes fruit, seeds, roots, insects, worms, frogs, lizards and occasionally snakes or small vertebrates.

Posted by Katie Kreder at 5:26 PM